The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)

Crimson Quill’s Appraisal #370

the-rocky-horror-picture-show-review

Number of Views: Multiple
Release Date: 14 August 1975
Sub-Genre: Musical/Comedy
Country of Origin: United Kingdom, United States
Budget: $1,400,000
Box Office: $139,900,000
Running Time: 100 minutes
Director: Jim Sharman
Producers: Lou Adler, Michael White
Screenplay: Jim Sharman, Richard O’Brien
Based on The Rocky Horror Show by Richard O’Brien
Special Effects: Colin Chilvers, Wally Veevers
Cinematography: Peter Suschitzky
Score: Richard O’Brien, Richard Hartley
Editing: Graeme Clifford
Studio: Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation, Michael White Productions
Distributor: 20th Century Fox, CBS/Fox
Stars: Tim Curry, Susan Sarandon, Barry Bostwick, Richard O’Brien Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, Nell Campbell, Jonathan Adams, Peter Hinwood, Meat Loaf Aday, Charles Gray, Jeremy Newson, Hilary Farr

The-Rocky-Horror-Picture-Show-Rivers-of-Grue (3)

Suggested Audio Candy:

Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, Nell Campbell & Charles GrayTime Warp

The-Rocky-Horror-Picture-Show-Rivers-of-Grue (3)

It’s not unheard of for Keeper to burst into impromptu verse at any given moment. Historically I reserve such renditions for those times behind…

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Can You Imagine

Can you imagine

This passion we share
Thunder clapping
As I clasped your hair
The light from above
Lightning strikes deep
Climax in unison
Pleasure so deep
Eyes locked in focus
Sweet kisses we reap
Air shared in abundance
Snuggled spooning complete

Feel us enter
A love that’s so rare
Hearts beating together
Together as one
Whispering forever
True love never ends
Brushing your hair softly
Fingers to cheek
Closeness of bodies
Drift off to sleep
Goodnight sweet dreams

A Few Notes Concerning Friendship

boy with a hat

maslows-hierarchy-of-needs

Friendship is, on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, the first item under the Love and Belonging category, just above thefundamental physiological and safety needs, and just below self-esteem and self-realization. Whether or not Maslow got it right is up for debate, but one thing’s clear – life without friends is a lonely vagabondage, which makes even the most solitary and self-sufficient of us feel that something is missing.

A friend can tell you things you don’t want to tell yourself.” – Frances Ward Weller

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What Etiquette Is – The Social Graces

Books and Stage
A Library

Did you know I was a school teacher at one time? Yes, I was that educator, the one children either admired or feared. I taught those hated subjects —> Mathematics and Science — to the sponge like minds of 6th, 7th and Eighth graders. Of the 435 students I had the pleasure to invade the brains of, only 3 really wanted to learn. Sad yes? Each school year my admin would send to my classroom about 435 souls. I took cell phones, knives and even one gun, from the hands of the unsuspecting. Yes we had a “Resource Officer” – a deputy sheriff who was more of a presence then a enforcer. Yes, I did enlist his help, after getting the gun in my hand.  The parent of said student said I had no right to take the weapon, she gave the “boy” it for his protection. Hmmm, lets teach something here…

People are not disturbed by things, but by the view they take of them. — Epictetus

Do any of you know what Etiquette is? Some say it is the Social Graces. I guess you must have to be really, really old to know what this is. Seems the younger generation just was not either taught it, or they decided that ME! ME! ME! is more important than having a gracious lifestyle. You know, I am not surprised. I wrote about Social Graces last century, In the 1990’s. I am still surprised of the number of websites that plagiarized my work, calling it their own. I have made This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

To be able to fill leisure intelligently is the last product of civilization, and at present very few people have reached this level. ~ Bertrand Russell

HERE IS THE First Page I hope you will read it in its entirety

People like to get along with other people. All your life you will be influenced by others, and in turn you will influence them. In order to set some standard for behavior, society has created what we call “etiquette”. Webster’s New World Dictionary defines etiquette as “the forms, manners, and ceremonies established by convention as acceptable or required by society, in a profession or in official life.” This section is to help you to learn how to follow the rules of etiquette. Also it should help you to learn to reason and become adaptable enough to make a few of your own rules for those inevitable social occasions that have no definite plan. Thus we might also consider etiquette as the ability to reason and do the right thing at the right time. If you can do this, you will have social grace.

There are three main steps toward becoming a socially gracious person. The first one comes at home, mostly during your early years, when family influences and relationships will probably carry on for the rest of your life. The second occurs at school, when you begin making friends and learn to get along with many other people. The third comes when you move from school out into the whole world of friends and strangers, which we call society. The main point for you, as an individual, is to be prepared to use good manners at all times in any one of the three settings– home, school, society.

Social grace comes with having poise. Poise comes with experience in meeting all kinds of people and knowing what to do or say. If you study this section, which gives you many of the acceptable rules of etiquette as well as some suggestions for meeting new problems, you will learn to feel more secure in all kinds of social situations.

More Etiquette At Home – Courtesy begins at home

Page 3 Entertaining Guest

Page 4 Social Graces at School

Page 5 Etiquette in Society

Page 6 Etiquette in Society; continued

Page 7 Etiquette in Society – Gifts

Page 8 Etiquette in Society – Correspondences

Page 9 Etiquette in Society – Travel

Drive is what makes us learn
Something’s Must Be Driven

Doing A Crime Can Reach Into Places Inside

((This IS A Joke – For Adults Only))

It was a nice sunny morning where Tom and Jerry were staying. They had taken a trip to one of those “Medical Cannabis” states to acquire the needed goods. After they had scored, the decided to fire one of those babies up. Little did they know a police officer was nearby and smelled the weed smoke. Soon they found themselves in the Iron Bar Motel.

The next morning they were presented to the judge for bond. The judge being a bit free spirited himself, decided since he would decide these two boys fate, he make them a plea.

The judge told them both;
“I will give you one week. ‘During this week you are to go out and convince people to give up drugs.’ ‘Be back here on Friday, then I will decide your sentence by the number of people you tell me gave drugs up.'”

They agreed and set out to do as the judge instructed.

On Friday they appeared before the judge. The judge asked Tom; “How many people did you convince to give up drugs?” Tom replied; “Your Honor I convinced 83 people to give up drugs.” The judge asked him how? Jerry said; “I told them they would be arrested if they did drugs, and told them of my experience here.” He showed the judge the evidence. The Judge then said; “That’s really great! You are free to go.”

Then the judge asked Jerry; How many people did you get to give up drugs?” And Jerry replied; “Your Honor I convinced 843,361 people, and counting, to give up drugs.” The Judge was astonished. “That is amazing! How did you do it!”

“Well your Honor, I used Social Media to get the word out.” I made a picture on my computer. Then I blogged it on WordPress, posted it to Facebook, Twitter and many other sites. “Really?” Said his honor. “Let me see the picture.”

Do not do Crime
                                                                   Before and after image of your asshole

A Tree Becomes What Is Inside

“What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.”

[Cosmos, Part 11: The Persistence of Memory (1980)]

Carl Sagan, Cosmos